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OREGANO (MARJORAM): SOME ADVICES FOR USING

Here is an eighteenth-century French recipe that will taste just as delectable with the stronger oregano or the milder marjoram:

Marinaded Veal Chops

Slice a pocket in veal chops, and insert an anchovy fdlet in each one. Make a marinade of equal parts of oil and vinegar, to which a crushed garlic clove and crushed fresh oregano has been added. Steep the meat in this marinade for at least 2 hours, turning once. Remove, and blot dry. Then brown the chops in oil or butter and transfer them to a casserole. Add i cup of dry white wine, a few drops of lemon juice, shallots and parsley, and cover tightly. Bake in a moderate oven for 30 minutes, or till tender. Cream can be substituted for the wine for a variation.

If you are a cole-slaw addict as I am, try this “hot-slaw” in the winter time for a change.

Hot Herb Slaw

Shred half a cabbage. Melt two tablespoons of butter in a large heavy pan, and fry the cabbage for several minutes, stirring to prevent its sticking, then add a half-cup of water, sprigs of basil, dill and oregano to taste. Mix through, simmer several minutes then stir in f cup of yoghurt. Heat again quickly and serve.

Does your hair come out in handfuls on the brush or comb? Make a strong infusion of marjoram: 2 handfuls of the fresh herb in a cup of water, and simmer gently for a few minutes, then let stand till lukewarm. Rub this solution well into the scalp after washing and rinsing the hair, and gently pat dry. It conditions and strengthens the hair as well.

Marjoram oil can be rubbed into joints and sinews if they start to stiffen or cramp after heavy exercise, particularly in the cold weather. You can make your own quite easily. And if you get a toothache right in the middle of Christmas dinner, chew leaves of marjoram over the spot to deaden the ache until you can rouse out your dentist. Marjoram used regularly in the diet helps to ward off stomach upsets and acts through the bloodstream as an internal antiseptic against those tummy “wogs”.

Altogether, a happy and rejoiceful herb.

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